Welcome to Fall I!

Camouflage Cat (2943738153)
By Dwight Sipler from Stow, MA, USA (Camouflage Cat Uploaded by Jacopo Werther) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Roman playwright Plautus is quoted as saying, “You must spend money to make money.” While this can be true in the business world, in the world of time management, it is especially true in education where the currency is time. Students need to be willing to spend time to make time. As you begin the Summer II session, here is a tip to be more productive. Just remember. On a trip through the desert, a camel can be your best friend. As you start this session, don’t forget your CAMEL: camel
Checklists Always Make Everything Logical

Taking the time to make a checklist for what you want to accomplish each day and each week can save time and stress over the next 8 weeks. Make sure that your checklists are specific and not vague. For example, don’t just say that you’re going to study between 5pm and 6pm on Tuesday. Instead, set a goal. On Tuesday, between 5pm and 6pm, I will read 15 pages from my Organizational Leadership text. Don’t just list research on your checklist. Instead, set the goal of finding two peer-reviewed, scholarly articles to use in your upcoming research paper. Sure, it takes a bit of time to complete a checklist, but the feeling you get when you can cross off a task is priceless, and you can keep your stress level in check. In the end, you will save time.

May you and your CAMEL have a lovely Fall I session.

Advertisements

Time Management for College Students

Pressure Cooker Free Zone
By Daniel Hass (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve all been there. You take a look at what needs to get done and realize that you have 36 hours of work to complete in a 24 hour span. You feel stressed. What can you do to avoid being caught in the pressure cooker of college life?

The Leatherby Libraries has come to your rescue with Christopher Vye, I. David Velch, and Kathlene Scholljegerdes’ wonderful book titled Under Pressure and Overwhelmed: Coping with Anxiety in College that provides some great ideas for taking the pressure off. Even better, you can access the text as an ebook. Simply click on the title in our post to see the book records. From there, select the connect to electronic book option. Once you have accessed the book, choose PDF Full Text.

In the book, Part Three: Managing Anxiety and Related Conditions: Solutions and Effective Approaches is dedicated to coping with the added stress of college on top of an already busy life. Chapter 10 is titled Time Management. It’s filled with tips and tools to make your life easier. It even has a time management matrix worksheet that you can use to help you think about the tasks that are urgent, not urgent, important, and not important. Don’t forget that time spent with family is important, and sometimes, time away from everything can be urgent. Give yourself some time to recharge your batteries.

Of course, you will want to check out some of the other chapters, such as Relaxation and Lifestyles Strategies or Making the Grade.

As always, keep your Brandman librarians in mind. We can help you save time with the research process, which means more time to spend on the things that are important to you. Once you get out of the pressure cooker, you can just relax.

TICO (8)
By Komisuamae (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Welcome to Spring I!

spring_I
By Unterillertaler (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Roman playwright Plautus is quoted as saying, “You must spend money to make money.” While this can be true in the business world, in the world of time management, it is especially true in education where the currency is time. Students need to be willing to spend time to make time. As you begin the Fall II session, here is a tip to be more productive. Just remember. On a trip through the desert, a camel can be your best friend. As you start this session, don’t forget your CAMEL: camel
Checklists Always Make Everything Logical

Taking the time to make a checklist for what you want to accomplish each day and each week can save time and stress over the next 8 weeks. Make sure that your checklists are specific and not vague. For example, don’t just say that you’re going to study between 5pm and 6pm on Tuesday. Instead, set a goal. On Tuesday, between 5pm and 6pm, I will read 15 pages from my Organizational Leadership text. Don’t just list research on your checklist. Instead, set the goal of finding two peer-reviewed, scholarly articles to use in your upcoming research paper. Sure, it takes a bit of time to complete a checklist, but the feeling you get when you can cross off a task is priceless, and you can keep your stress level in check. In the end, you will save time.

May you and your CAMEL have a lovely Spring I session.