ILLiad Request Tip: Book or Book Chapter?

portrait of book by van Eyck
Jan van Eyck (circa 1390–1441) [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1923}} – published before 1923 and public domain in the US.

Here at the library, we’ve noticed that students are a bit confused with the results from EBSCOhost when it comes to books. Books and book chapters use the same icon: book image

To solve this dilemma, we created a great new video: Book or Book Chapter: Recognizing the Difference in EBSCO Databases:

Book or Book Chapter image

Just click on the arrow to view the video. As always, if you need some help, just ask a librarian.

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Interlibrary Loan Tip: Book or Book Chapter?

portrait of book by van Eyck
Jan van Eyck (circa 1390–1441) [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1923}} – published before 1923 and public domain in the US.

Here at the library, we’ve noticed that students are a bit confused with the results from EBSCOhost when it comes to books. Books and book chapters use the same icon: book image

To solve this dilemma, we created a great new video: Book or Book Chapter: Recognizing the Difference in EBSCO Databases:

Book or Book Chapter image

Just click on the arrow to view the video. As always, if you need some help, just ask a librarian.

Interlibrary Loan Tip: Book or Book Chapter?

portrait of book by van Eyck
Jan van Eyck (circa 1390–1441) [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1923}} – published before 1923 and public domain in the US.

Here at the library, we’ve noticed that students are a bit confused with the results from EBSCOhost when it comes to books. Books and book chapters use the same icon: book image

To solve this dilemma, we created a great new video: Book or Book Chapter: Recognizing the Difference in EBSCO Databases:

Book or Book Chapter image

Just click on the arrow to view the video. As always, if you need some help, just ask a librarian.

Recognizing the Difference: Book or Book Chapter

Jan van Eyck 059
Jan van Eyck (circa 1390–1441) [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1923}} – published before 1923 and public domain in the US.

Here at the library, we’ve noticed that students are a bit confused with the results from EBSCOhost when it comes to books. Books and book chapters use the same icon: book image

To solve this dilemma, we created a great new video: Book or Book Chapter: Recognizing the Difference in EBSCO Databases:

Book or Book Chapter image

Just click on the arrow to view the video. As always, if you need some help, just ask a librarian.

Interlibrary Loan Books: Cut-Off Today

Hiking in Knee Socks, Sandals, and Cut-offs
By Oddman47 (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Cut-offs are in today, and not just for the gentleman above. Today, November 23, is the last day that you can request interlibrary loan books for the Fall II session. If you need a book that we don’t have ion our collection, make sure to place your request today.

This cut-off is only for interlibrary loan books. You can still place requests for journal articles and materials from the Leatherby Libraries’ collection.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Returning Borrowed Items

Old_mail_box

Image via Wikimedia Commons

When you request a book from our collection or  via interlibrary loan using your ILLiad account, we send these items out to you free of charge. Included in the package you receive is a return envelope that is unique to your item. This return packaging has a label with a tracking number that is tied to the address listed in your ILLiad account. For this reason, it is important that you mail the item back from the city that is listed in your account to avoid shipping delays or possible lost packages.

If you decide to take your borrowed items with you on vacation, please do not mail them from the vacation location. Instead, contact us to see if a renewal is possible and then mail the item back to us once you return from your trip.

 

These Books Have Different Due Dates: ILL Lending Periods

IMG_4684

Books as far as the eye can see, but we still may not have YOUR book…

We have so many resources available for you here at the Leatherby Libraries; however, we do not have everything. Sometimes, when you are conducting your research, you may come across a book or article that we don’t own. That’s when interlibrary loan is useful. Using your ILLiad account, you can place a request for the article or book and have it supplied by another library. If you are requesting an article, an electronic copy of the item will be delivered directly to your ILLiad account. You will have 30 days to log in and view that article. After 30 days, it will simply disappear, meaning you don’t need to remember any due dates for articles.

Requesting a book is different. We are unable to request ebooks via interlibrary loan, so any book request is processed for a physical copy of the item, and it will be sent directly to your listed address. This is where things get a little tricky: with items that we own, students are given a 6 week checkout period, but with items from another library, the checkout period can vary. All interlibrary loan items are subject to the circulation policies of the library that is loaning the item to us, so that can mean a shorter checkout period. All is not lost, however, if you receive an ILL item and you need more time with it, simply call us 5-7 days before the due date so we can place a renewal request for you. Renewal requests are at the discretion of the lending library, so they aren’t guaranteed, but most libraries are happy to grant more time.

Every ILL item is affixed with a bright red slip on the front of the book that clearly states the due date for that particular item. If you check out many items, be sure to keep track of each individual due date. Also remember: if you have any questions regarding items you have checked out, we are only a phone call away!

Return to Sender: Using Your Brandman Email Address

US airmail-Fr 1942 RTS Service Suspended
By United States Post Office Department [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

We love it when Brandman students sign up for interlibrary loan (ILLiad), but there’s one thing that many of them overlook: using their Brandman email address. We realize that your school email address is probably not the first one that you check on a daily basis; however, it is the only one that is compatible with our ILLiad system. All of the automatic communications that are sent from the library are sent to the Brandman address. If you have a book that is nearing its due date? An email is generated to the Brandman address. If you request an electronic journal article? An email is generated to the Brandman address. If you are assessed a fine? An email is generated to the Brandman address. You can see how important it is for you to use this address. We don’t want there to be any delay in your material requests, so make sure to use your Brandman email address. No one wants to see Return to Sender!

If you have any questions, please contact your Brandman library staff. We’re here to help!

Cut through the Dissertation Confusion

Way to Akiba secret area
By Stéfan Le Dû from Nantes, France [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Lately, we have been getting numerous requests through interlibrary loan for dissertations, and we have been cancelling the requests since we do have access to them in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database. Don’t get me wrong. We love our Discover! search feature. It covers about 95% of the databases that we subscribe to in a single search, but what falls in the other 5%? Well, access to full text of dissertations is part of the uncovered material, so before you click on that Request through interlibrary loan option, take one more step.

When you see this dissertation it’s time to perform one more search.
Just follow the instructions for “How do I obtain a copy of a thesis/dissertation online through the Leatherby Libraries?

We want you to have the fastest access to the information you need. If you need any assistance with locating a thesis or dissertation, just contact your Brandman library staff. We’re here to help.

What is Interlibrary Loan?

spooky books

A selection of books you may want to check out.

What happens if you find a citation for the PERFECT book, but when you search our catalog, you come up empty? Or what if you find the perfect article, but when you click on “Check for Full Text”, there is no full text to be found? You don’t have to give up hope! Here at the Leatherby Libraries, we offer Interlibrary Loan (ILL) services free of charge.

An interlibrary loan is the process by which we request an item from another library for our patron. Although we strive to have an extensive collection for our patrons, we work with a system of participating libraries throughout the country that allow us to search through their catalogs and borrow items from them. There are some restrictions and stipulations for requesting an item via interlibrary loan.

For starters, the item may become available from any library throughout the entire country. The borrow system allows the first available library to fulfill the request, so for example, you may order a book and a library in San Diego fulfills the request, but next time your place a request, it may be fulfilled by a library in New York. This is why we say it may take 2-3 weeks for you to receive the item because we cannot predict how far the book will have to travel. However, most journal articles are received within 3-4 days, and you can access them electronically.

The other restriction is that we must abide by the loan and renewal guidelines set forth by the loaning library. Our typical checkout period is 6 weeks, and we allow at least one renewal. Other libraries may have shorter or longer check out periods, and some do not allow any renewals. We cannot alter borrowing policies for items that we do not own. If you have an ILL item that you wish to keep longer, please contact us a week before the due date so we can submit a renewal request to the lending library for you.

Requesting an Interlibrary Loan is easy! You are going to use the same account you use to request items that we own here in the library, your ILLiad account.

When you create your request, be sure to include as much information as possible. For example, if you are requesting a book, please include the complete title and the author’s full name. If you are requesting an article, we will need the journal title, the article title, the year, and the volume and issue number. If we don’t have all the relevant information, it will delay your request processing.

If you have any further questions about the interlibrary loan process, don’t hesitate to contact the Brandman University Library Assistant at 1-800-344-5756 or ill@chapman.edu