Before You Request that Dissertation in ILLiad. . .

Way to Akiba secret area
By Stéfan Le Dû from Nantes, France [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Lately, we have been getting numerous requests through interlibrary loan for dissertations, and we have been cancelling the requests since we do have access to them in the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database. Don’t get me wrong. We love our Discover! search feature. It covers about 95% of the databases that we subscribe to in a single search, but what falls in the other 5%? Well, access to full text of dissertations is part of the uncovered material, so before you click on that Request through interlibrary loan option, take one more step.

When you see this dissertation it’s time to perform one more search.
Just follow the instructions for “How do I obtain a copy of a thesis/dissertation online through the Leatherby Libraries?

We want you to have the fastest access to the information you need. If you need any assistance with locating a thesis or dissertation, just contact your Brandman library staff. We’re here to help.

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Using Dissertations: The Overlooked Resource

painting of man sitting in chair
Léon Bakst [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1996}} – public domain in a source country on January 1, 1996 and in the US.

Many students forget to consider dissertations and theses as sources for their research. These are great tools to use, not only for the dissertation itself, but for the research gathered to create it. Where do you start? Begin by selecting General Databases at the bottom of the library homepage. This will take you to the General Databases Electronic Resources page. From there, select Connect under Dissertations & Theses: Full Text – ProQuest. Perform your search.

You found a great dissertation that supports your research. Now what? Why, you should mine the references! At the end of the dissertation, examine the references used. If these is a useful journal article, use the Journal Finder to see if we have access. If there is an interesting book, check our Library catalog.

Remember. There is no need for you to scramble for sources. If someone has already done the work, why not save some time?

As always, please keep your Brandman library staff in mind if you need assistance. We are here to help!

Dissertations: An Overlooked Resource

painting of man sitting in chair
Léon Bakst [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1996}} – public domain in a source country on January 1, 1996 and in the US.

Many students forget to consider dissertations and theses as sources for their research. These are great tools to use, not only for the dissertation itself, but for the research gathered to create it. Where do you start? Begin by selecting General Databases at the bottom of the library homepage. This will take you to the General Databases Electronic Resources page. From there, select Connect under Dissertations & Theses: Full Text – ProQuest. Perform your search.

You found a great dissertation that supports your research. Now what? Why, you should mine the references! At the end of the dissertation, examine the references used. If these is a useful journal article, use the Journal Finder to see if we have access. If there is an interesting book, check our Library catalog.

Remember. There is no need for you to scramble for sources. If someone has already done the work, why not save some time?

As always, please keep your Brandman library staff in mind if you need assistance. We are here to help!

It’s That Dissertation Time of Year

street signs with confusing arrows
By Stéfan Le Dû from Nantes, France [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

You’ve worked hard to gather the information for your dissertation. Now that you’re ready to format it, where can you find the guidelines and checklist? Follow these steps to avoid confusion.

1. On the library homepage, click on the “Additional Services” dropdown menu on the left side of the page.

dissertation1

2. Select “Dissertation / Thesis Guidelines.”

Once you reach the Dissertation / Thesis Guidelines page, simply follow the instructions. There’s even contact information for the Dissertation/Thesis Administrator. Remember, you are not alone, so if you need further assistance, please contact your Brandman library staff.

Dissertations: A Great Resource

Богданов-Бельский Сельская школа
Nikolay Bogdanov-Belsky [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Many students forget to consider dissertations and theses as sources for their research. These are great tools to use, not only for the dissertation itself, but for the research gathered to create it. Where do you start? Begin by selecting General Databases at the bottom of the library homepage. This will take you to the General Databases Electronic Resources page. From there, select Connect under Dissertations & Theses: Full Text – ProQuest. Perform your search.

You found a great dissertation that supports your research. Now what? Why, you should mine the references! At the end of the dissertation, examine the references used. If these is a useful journal article, use the Journal Finder to see if we have access. If there is an interesting book, check our Library catalog.

Remember. There is no need for you to scramble for sources. If someone has already done the work, why not save some time?

As always, please keep your Brandman library staff in mind if you need assistance. We are here to help!

Spotlight on Education

Jean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin 015
Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
{{PD-1923}} – published before 1923 and public domain in the US.

Whether you are new to the education program or already entrenched, here are some highlights of resources to help put your research on the right track:

  • Education Research Guide: the go-to subject guide for the library’s print and online resources for education
  • Video Tutorials Repository: a collection of the library’s video tutorials on conducting research, locating library resources, and learning about library services
  • EdD Dissertation Cohort Information: instructions for locating the handbooks and cohort information for EdD students (note: Brandman login required)
  • Dissertations: directions for accessing the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database to find published dissertations on your research topic
  • APA Style Guide to Electronic References: the official guidelines for citing electronic resources in APA style (note: Click on the “View or Print” link to access. You will need to enter your first and last name as well as your Brandman ID# for access.)
  • Professional Editors and Statisticians Information (provided by Brandman’s Online Writing Community): a list of pre-screened, independent editors and statisticians that students can hire for dissertation editing and assistance (note: Brandman login required; see the Graduate Writing and Publication Process page for more details)

As always, Ask a Librarian if you need further assistance.

Spotlight on Nursing

Gabriel Nicolet - Portrait of a Nurse from the Red Cross
By Gabriel Émile Édouard Nicolet (Swiss, 1856-1921) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Whether you are new to the nursing program or already entrenched, here are some highlights of resources to help put your research on the right track:

  • Nursing Research Guide: the go-to subject guide for the library’s print and online resources for nursing
  • Video Tutorials Repository: a collection of the library’s video tutorials on conducting research, locating library resources, and learning about library services
  • Clinical Scholarly Project: instructions for locating the handbook for DNP Clinical Scholarly Project (note: Brandman login required)
  • Dissertations: directions for accessing the ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global database to find published dissertations on your research topic
  • APA Style Guide to Electronic References: the official guidelines for citing electronic resources in APA style (note: Click on the “View or Print” link to access. You will need to enter your first and last name as well as your Brandman ID# for access.)

As always, Ask a Librarian if you need further assistance.

Dissertation Guidelines: Where Do I Go?

Way to Akiba secret area
By Stéfan Le Dû from Nantes, France [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

You’ve worked hard to gather the information for your dissertation. Now that you’re ready to format it, where can you find the guidelines and checklist? Follow these steps to avoid confusion.

1. On the library homepage, click on the “Additional Services” dropdown menu on the left side of the page.

dissertation1

2. Select “Dissertation / Thesis Guidelines.”

Once you reach the Dissertation / Thesis Guidelines page, simply follow the instructions. There’s even contact information for the Dissertation/Thesis Administrator. Remember, you are not alone, so if you need further assistance, please contact your Brandman library staff.

Using Dissertations as a Resource

Sanzio 01 Heraclitus
Raphael [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Many students forget to consider dissertations and theses as sources for their research. These are great tools to use, not only for the dissertation itself, but for the research gathered to create it. Where do you start? Begin by selecting General Databases at the bottom of the library homepage. This will take you to the General Databases Electronic Resources page. From there, select Connect under Dissertations & Theses: Full Text – ProQuest. Perform your search.

You found a great dissertation that supports your research. Now what? Why, you should mine the references! At the end of the dissertation, examine the references used. If these is a useful journal article, use the Journal Finder to see if we have access. If there is an interesting book, check our Library catalog.

Remember. There is no need for you to scramble for sources. If someone has already done the work, why not save some time?

As always, please keep your Brandman library staff in mind if you need assistance. We are here to help!

Dissertations & Theses: Mining for More Sources

Miners in the Sierras
Charles Christian Nahl [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Many students overlook dissertations and theses as sources for their research. These are great tools to use, not only for the dissertation itself, but for the research gathered to create it. Where do you start? Begin by selecting General Databases at the bottom of the library hompage. This will take you to the General Databases Electronic Resources page. From there, select Connect under Dissertations & Theses: Full Text – ProQuest. Perform your search.

You found a great dissertation that supports your research. Now what? Why, you should mine the references! At the end of the dissertation, examine the references used. If these is a useful journal article, use the Journal Finder to see if we have access. If there is an interesting book, check our Library catalog.

Remember. There is no need for you to scramble for sources. If someone has already done the work, why not save some time?

As always, please keep your Brandman library staff in mind if you need assistance. We are here to help!